What is the Pupil Premium?

The Pupil Premium is additional funding given to publicly funded schools in England to raise the attainment of disadvantaged pupils and close the gap between them and their peers. It is paid to schools according to the number of pupils who have been:

  • registered as eligible for free school meals at any point in the last 6 years;
  • been in care for 6 months or longer.

In 2015-2016 and again in 2016-2017 secondary schools received £935, more details can be found at here.

The service premium is designed to support children with parents serving in the regular British armed forces, schools will receive £300 for each eligible pupil. More details can be found at here.

Using the Pupil Premium at Wadebridge School

For any matters to do with Pupil Premium please contact our Pupil Premium Advocate:-

Susi DeLisle - sdelisle@wadebridge.cornwall.sch.uk

Pupil Premium mobile - 07580272343

What impact is the Pupil Premium having on improving pupil outcomes?

We constantly monitor the impact of individual strategies by looking at pupil progress, listening to pupil voice and analysing results (both internal and external). However, it must be noted that the strategies listed below were designed to operate in a complimentary way and it is difficult to evaluate any one strategy in isolation but where strategies seem to be having little impact they are quickly altered or dropped completely; where strategies appear to be having a positive impact we seek to build on this success. 

The linked document shows a detailed analysis of the exam results for Wadebridge School 2 years (2015 and 2016) using the DfE's new performance indicators. Exam results 2015 and 2016.

These results show that disadvantaged pupils at Wadebridge School make better progress than their disadvantaged peers nationally and the gap between disadvantaged pupils at Wadebridge and the natioanal average for other pupils is narrowing. Ofsted's analysis of the school's GCSE results in 2016 show that

"Disadvantaged pupils’ Progress 8 was not significantly below national other overall or for any prior attainment group" (Wadebridge School, Ofsted Inspection Dashboard, 2016)

The Progress 8 scores for disadvantaged pupils from Wadebridge School clearly shows that the way we are using the pupil premium is having a positive impact on closing the gap between the performance of disadvantaged pupils and other pupils.

The Education Endowment Foundation has published a toolkit to help schools analyse the performance of disadvantaged pupils and to help narrow the attainment gap between those supported by the Pupil Premium and their peers. This analysis compares our school performance with other similar schools and shows how students supported by the Pupil Premium at Wadebridge School perform compared to those in similar schools. This analysis can be accessed here: EEF Family of Schools database. Close analysis of this data also shows that disadvantaged pupils at Wadebridge School achieve well in relation to their peers in other similar school. 

We carry out annual reviews focussed on the provision for disadvantaged pupils an these can be accessed below:

  • In June 2016 we invited senior leaders from two other schools to help us carry out a review of our provision for those supported by the Pupil Premium. A summary of this report can be accessed here.
  • In June 2015 we commissioned Cornwall Learning to carry out a follow-up review which highlights the high quality of support provided for disadvantaged students at Wadebridge School and states that disadvantaged "pupils achieve good and rapidly improving outcomes." The full report can be accessed here.
  • In May 2014 we commissioned Cornwall Learning to carry out an independent review of the impact of Pupil Premium at Wadebridge School. This review was very positive about what we have been doing and provided some useful pointers for further development: the full document can be accessed here. 

Plans for spending Pupil Premium in 2017-18

Initial indications are that we will receive £935 per eligible pupil to support around 200 disadvantaged students in 2017-18 amounting to around £185 000. We constantly monitor the effectiveness of our spending of the pupil premium grant and our plans are therefore constantly under review. Given the successful results achieved by the pupils eligible for the pupil premium in the 2016 GCSE results many of the strategies from this year will be continued but the performance of disadvantaged students in 2017 was significantly impeded by poor attendance and as a result we have redirected a substantial amount of the Pupil Premium grant to employ our own dedicated Educational Welfare Officer whose focus will be to improve pupil attendance and reduce persistent absence. Full details of our plans will be published soon. Please note that we will continue to evaluate the effectiveness of each strategy and may adjust our plans as the year unfolds.
 

How have we spent the Pupil Premium in the past?

"The intervention that I found the most effective was individual tutoring sessions as they helped us raise concerns in any of our subject areas which made GCSEs less stressful due to getting the help that we needed but didn't ask for, I feel that this intervention strategy helped me the most. The Go for it camp helped me the most when it came to revising and leading up to GCSEs, I feel that this gave me the confidence to do well in my exams as it showed me and others that we are capable of achieving what we thought was too aspirational, I feel as if this was the most effective strategy out of all the intervention techniques. I don't know if this was part of intervention but Learning Cafe was also a great way of revising for the most technical subject such as sciences and humanities, I know this because I got higher grades than I predicted in additional science and EPR. It also helped that they provided transport for those who found it difficult to attend."   

Comments from Jess, a 16 year old student who was supported by the Pupil Premium.

2016-17

In 2016 we adopted a slightly different approach to previous years and publish our plans for spending the pupil premium funds using a format suggested by the National College for Teaching and Leadership in conjunction with the Teaching Schools Council. The details of these plans and a review of their effectiveness can be seen on the attached document: Pupil Premium Strategy Statement and Review. The review of ours spending in 2016-17 has been used to develop our strategy for 2017-18.

2015-16
  • Licence for 4Matrix to enable effective tracking of the progress of disadvantaged pupils, cost £1,000 all from Pupil Premium
  • Pupil Premium Bursary (£100 per student): cost £18,500 all from Pupil Premium
  • Learning resources and support for educational visits for pupils in receipt of FSM: cost £5,000 all from Pupil Premium
  • CPD for pupil premium advocates, including Cornwall Learning pupil premium briefings, resilience training: cost £1,000 all from Pupil Premium
  • Deployment of 2 dedicated advocate for children supported by the Pupil Premium (1.0 + 0.8 fte): cost £31,500 all from Pupil Premium
  • Deployment of 6 department based HLTAs with a specific focus on promoting the progress of students supported by the Pupil Premium: cost £108,000, £71,550 from Pupil Premium
  • Intervention in Maths 0.5 fte: cost £20,000 all from Pupil Premium
  • Investors in Excellence Go For It for programme in KS4: cost £3,000 all from Pupil Premium
  • Alternative curriculum provision: cost £40,000, £8,000 from Pupil Premium
  • Period 6, Learning Café refreshments and transport: cost £8,000, £2,000 from Pupil Premium  
  • Sound Training for Reading programme introduced in Year 10: cost £3,600  all from Pupil Premium
  • External Review of provision (Cornwall Learning): cost £1,000 all from Pupil Premium
  • KS3 pastoral intervention programme: cost £5,000, £3,000 from Pupil Premium
  • Deployment of Education Engagement Partner: cost £18,900, £5,000 from the Pupil Premium
Total £173,910
 
2014-15

In 2014 the value of the Pupil Premium rose to £935 for secondary pupils, the 185 pupils supported by the Pupil Premium generated an income of £172,975 in 2014-15. The money was spent as follows:

  • Intervention classes in Maths and English delivered by subject specialist teachers in small groups or one to one (cost £60,000 of which £40,000 will come from the Pupil Premium)
  • Introduction of Sound Training for Reading in Year 10 as a reading intervention (cost of the pilot programme is £3,360 which will be fully funded from the Pupil Premium)
  • Deployment of 6 subject specialist Higher Level Teaching Assistants to work within English, Maths, Science, Geography, History and Ethics Philosophy & Religion with a specific focus to promote the progress of students in Years 7-11 supported by the Pupil Premium (cost £108,000 of which £43,815 will come from the Pupil Premium)
  • Provision of learning equipment and financial assistance with educational visits for pupils supported by the Pupil Premium (cost £5,000 all to come from the Pupil Premium)
  • Investors in Excellence Go For It programme in Key Stage 4 to raise the aspirations of Year 11 students supported by the Pupil Premium (cost  £3,000 all of which will come from the Pupil Premium)
  • Alternative curriculum provision on vocational courses at Cornwall College (cost £60,000 of which £16,800 is to be funded through the Pupil Premium)
  • The extension of the school day to include a period 6 after school with transport home provided on two days each week (cost £8,000 of which the Pupil Premium will contribute £2,000)
  • The deployment of a Teaching Assistant to support the progress of lower ability students in Year 8 many of whom are supported by the Pupil Premium (cost £9,000 all of which will come from the Pupil Premium)
  • Following on from the successful work of our Pupil Premium Advocate last year we will be deploying two Advocates to focus on the progress and well-being of all students supported by the Pupil Premium (cost £31,500 all of which will be funded by the Pupil Premium)
  • The introduction of a £100 personal budget for all students supported by the Pupil Premium (cost £18,500 all of which will come from Pupil Premium funds)
     

Total spend for 2014-15 was £172, 975

2013-14

The value of the Pupil Premium increased in 2013-14 to £900 per pupil and the school received around £152,100 to specifically support 165 students. This money is planned to be spent in the following ways:

  •  Intervention class (£20,000) one: small group tuition in En & Ma for 'stuck' pupils in Key Stage 3 & 4
  • Small class sizes in core subjects (£42,000). Additional classes in KS4 English, Maths and Science blocks to keep average class sizes below 24:-
  • Provision of learning equipment and financial assistance with educational visits for pupils supported by the Pupil Premium (£10,800)
  • Specialist careers advice and guidance for all pupils in receipt of FSM in Years 9, 10 & 11 (£4,950)
  • Appointment of dedicated advocate for children supported by the Pupil Premium (£23,350)
  • Deployment of department based HLTAs with a specific focus on promoting the progress of students supported by the Pupil Premium  (£46,000)
  • Investors in Excellence Go For It programme in KS4 (£5,000)

Total spend for 2013-14 was £152,100

2012-13

Following an increase in the value of the Pupil Premium and a change in the rules regarding those pupils who it is aimed at, the school received £99,000 in 2012-13 to support 165 pupils identified in the Spring Census. This money was allocated as follows:

  • Intervention classes (£13,800) One to small group tuition in KS3 & 4
  • Small class sizes in core subjects: Science (£23,637); an extra two classes in English and Maths in both Years 10 and 11 to keep the average class size below 22 (£47,273)
  • The appointment of a dedicated HLTA for 2 days per week to act as an advocate for pupils supported by the Pupil Premium (£9,340)
  • Provision of learning equipment for pupils supported by the Pupil Premium (£4,950)

Total spend for 2012-13 was £99,000

2011-12

In 2011-12 we were allocated £37,437 and received the money in four installments through the year. These funds were in addition to the main school budget and were allocated to support the learning and achievement of pupils who claimed free school meals but it should be noted that some of the initiatives and projects had a knock on benefit for all learners.

  • Intervention classes (£13,800)
  • Pupils in Key Stage 3 identified as ‘stuck’ in terms of National Curriculum levels in English and Maths received 10 hours of tuition in small groups (less than 5 pupils) to address whatever was stopping them from making progress. This helped many pupils to progress from  being stuck at  level 4.
  • Students in Key Stage 4 identified as in danger of not making expected progress in English and Maths received intervention sessions in small groups of less than 5 to boost their performance with a view to help them achieve a C grade in these important subjects. This helped a number of students secure a C grade in English and/or Maths.
  • Additional classes were put on the time table to support pupils’ development in Science. This included an extra class in Year 9 to facilitate pupils starting their GCSE studies in Year 9 and an additional 2 classes in Year 10 and 11 to make the average class sizes in Science less than 22 for KS4 GCSE groups.
  • Smaller class sizes (£18 182 in Years 10 and 11; £5 455 in Year 9)

Total spend for 2011-12 was £37,437

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Notices

Prom Fashion Show tickets will be available from 20 November from the Library. Fashion Show is 7 December.

New vacancy - Nursery Assistant in our Nursery - Wiggles.

Autumn 2017 Sports Practices

A level results continue to rise at Wadebridge Sixth Form

New School Day Timing - September 2017